5 Tips to Stay Productive While Traveling

09 July

Working while traveling has become more than just occasional. More and more people either choose or need to work from all over the world, requiring only a laptop and a decent internet connection. Moreover, some people even prefer using technology to earn a living and, more generally, conduct their lives in a nomadic manner, hence their name “digital nomads.” And even though these are rather an exception, more and more people have to complete their assignments away from the office.

On the other hand, traveling can easily throw you off your regular routine. This might also be a reason why, according to a Hyatt Place and Hyatt House survey, 65 percent of people feel pressure to work longer hours when traveling for business.

But it doesn’t have to be like this. We have compiled a list of useful tips that will help you stay productive everywhere you go.

Plan ahead

There most likely will be quite a few inconveniences along the way, and sometimes you will also have to conduct emergency communication with your clients and/or teammates. Before you leave for a trip, make sure that anyone work-related is informed about where you are and what hours you will be available for contact. Organize everything before you leave and don’t forget to sync your devices, set reminders, and calendar to the local time of your destination, so you don’t miss any deadlines.

Don’t let go of the office

Steven Dominguez, a business traveler and a vice president of global brands for the Hyatt chain recommends always staying connected. While you may be unable to attend in-person meetings, rather than putting a meeting off until your return, touch base with colleagues or boss through WhatsApp, Google Hangouts or Skype. Airport? Hotel room? Who cares as long as you are delivering.

Your gadgets are key

Without your devices, you won’t get anywhere. Research ahead of time what you need for your laptop, phone, etc. when you’re traveling, especially if there are differences like the sockets, adapters, and the like. Make sure that you have all the gadgets and their accompanying pieces – chargers, power banks, pocket WiFi, and so on. You may also need specific software or services like VPN if you need to access websites that are only accessible from IP addresses based in your home country. You don’t necessarily need to buy it, there is a plenty of good VPN services available for free. Having your own Internet connection source can also solve a multitude of problems. Places that offer free WiFi will be used by a lot of people, which can make the connection unbearably slow, and, moreover, not all countries have WiFi everywhere you go. For instance, 80 percent of The Yukon, Canada is completely internet-free; India’s internet user penetration rate is less than 20 percent; or China, where you won’t be able to access a website, unless it’s servers are located in the country.

If you can’t work, study.

Productivity isn’t always about crossing out everything on your to-do list, there is always some knowledge that you struggle to get due to your busy schedule, so when you do get the chance to sit down and work, you’re prepared. Before your trip, pack a book, download a few podcasts, and so on. Make it more about “input” rather than just “output.” This can be an equally valid way to remain productive, especially in the times when your environment is not suitable for work.

Get an accountability buddy

Have someone either work with you at the exact same times or check in with you daily to make sure you’ve done everything you were supposed to. Discuss the plan in advance and tell them how important it is for the both of you to hit your daily goal for hours worked. If there’s no incentive for this person to hold you accountable, make it fun for them by setting a list of rewards.